Evolving Tanks 10/24/14

Updated 10/31/14, 12/27/15

5-gallon Fluval Chi.

It’s been over a month since I began my opae ‘ula tanks. I now have four set up in different places in the apartment. A common element in all four is a sponge filter. In three, I’ve also added a pile of coral rocks on one end.

The original 5-gallon Fluval Chi has undergone some changes. (See the original.) I removed the kit filter-lighting system and added a small sponge filter. I moved the aquarium to the right side of the long desk, but it’s still receiving a lot of indirect sunlight from the south-facing louvered window.

Update 10/30/14: Fluval Chi — concerned about the salt water evaporation in a room full of electronic equipment, I decided to cover the large opening on the top to reduce the amount. I laid a rectangular piece of glass over the opening, but it drew the evaporation to the edges and over the side, so that didn’t work. I finally resorted to the old standby, duct tape, to cover the opening. It’s ugly, but it seems to be working — sorta. Salt crystals are beginning to accumulate along the edges of the tape. I’ll have to find a better solution.

On the left side of my desk, closest to the south-facing window, is this standard 5-gallon tank with a glass cover. The sponge filter in this unit is a little bigger. This tank gets the most indirect sunlight.

On the left side of the desk, closest to the south-facing window, is this standard 5-gallon tank with a glass cover. The sponge filter in this unit is a little bigger. This tank gets the most indirect sunlight.

This 2-gallon tank is on a table in the 2nd bedroom with large windows and a sliding glass door that covers the entire south-facing wall. On the other side, the tank is also indirectly exposed to light coming from the large west-facing windows and sliding glass door.

This 2-gallon tank is on a table in the 2nd bedroom with floor-to-ceiling windows and a sliding glass door that stretches across most of the south-facing wall. On the back side, visible in the background, the tank is also indirectly exposed to light coming from the floor-to-ceiling west-facing windows and sliding glass door.

Makeshift 2-gallon tank made from a plastic water-purifying system that I found at the local Goodwill for a few dollars. It sits on the kitchen counter and receives indirect sunlight from the large west-facing windows and glass sliding door.

Makeshift 2-gallon tank made from a plastic water-purifying system that I found at the local Goodwill for a few dollars. It sits on the kitchen counter and receives indirect sunlight from the floor-to-ceiling west-facing windows and glass sliding door.

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