Glass Jar with Lid: New Opae’ula Tank

Added coral in a condo formation rather than a substrate.

Added coral in a condo formation rather than a substrate. In the 1.5-gallon oblong tank on the right, the coral is arranged as a substrate, completely covering the gravel bed.

Here's a view of the air line protected by a pair of rubber shims.

Here’s a view of the coral condo from the top, with lid removed. You can also see the air line protected by a pair of rubber shims cut from a clear plastic hose. The orange blurs in the tank are the opae’ula that I just added.

A view from the top, with the lid removed. If you look closely you can see some of the opae'ula I added.

Another view of the condo from the top, with lid removed. I added five opae’ula from the 18-gallon to begin this new colony. If you look closely you can see some of them.

Front view. This will be the primary viewing angle, with the open field in front and the condo in the back. Some of the opae are clearly visible. They're very curious and have already begun to explore their new world.

Front view. This will be the primary viewing angle, with the open field in front and the condo in back. Some of the opae are clearly visible. They’re very curious and have already begun to explore their new world.

Side view.

Side view. I wanted to give the colony a gravel field to graze in. Not sure if they need or want it. I may decide to cover the black gravel substrate with a layer of coral to give them a larger hypogeal habitat.

See related article: Build Your Own UGF

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5 Responses to Glass Jar with Lid: New Opae’ula Tank

  1. Robin says:

    Cool. Love the rubber shim idea. I glued buttons to the edge of my 2 gal. but they’re already popping up out of the glue. Fortunately they land on the table and not in the tank. I’m thinking I should try cutting the end off one of my syphon tubes for my aquariums and see if that will work. You come up with some wonderful, and practical!, ideas!

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    • JimS says:

      Lol. That’s exactly where I got the slices of rubber rings from — my fat siphon tube. I ended up doubling each of the shims, one ring over another, to increase the thickness. The glass lid is so heavy that it was still crimping the air line. I tried so many other ideas before these rings that are too dumb to mention. For example, the small ceramic dish on my desktop gallon tank is still shimmed by two plastic clips, one on either side of the air line, that I got from the packaging of a shirt. They’re a bad fit and slide into odd angles, but they do the job. I’ll be replacing them when I get the chance. Funny how we’re slow to redo these juryrigged fixes. In time, they become permanent — ugly but effective. I have a few of these in other parts of my life, usually involving duct tape.

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  2. I would put a few more shims / spacers all around the rim so it sit evenly and as an extra, you get more open airiness.
    Your idea was great, I had never thought of it. I will be using the technique a lot.

    Thanks!

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    • JimS says:

      Clint, thanks for the tip! Didn’t think of that. Right now, I’m experimenting with a pump that sits on the tank, so the cover is permanently off. Apologies for the slow reply. Work is keeping me busy. -Jim

      Like

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