Opaeula in 18-gallon Tank: 27 Dec. 2017

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5 Responses to Opaeula in 18-gallon Tank: 27 Dec. 2017

  1. Ann says:

    So cute! Beautiful picture of life.
    Ann

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    • JimS says:

      These little guys are amazing. They require almost no care. No feeding. They’re so small that they live off the algae created by sunlight in the brackish water. The trick for hobbyists is to create a balanced environment that sustains and nurtures them. When a tank is healthy, the tiny shrimp reproduce and are active 24/7. When the conditions are just right, all we need to do is top off the water. We don’t even need to clean the glass. I’m still searching for the ideal mechanical-organic filtration system. I keep returning to undergravel filtration (UGF) systems. This tank relies on natural sunlight only. So placement is also important. Thanks for your comment: “So cute! Beautiful picture of life.” In just a few words, you’ve captured my attraction to this hobby.

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      • Ann says:

        They’re the most fascinating animals that I have ever seen! Thank you for a glimpse into their world. Setting up and maintaining their environment is so interesting. Dwarf shrimp are wonderful, but the Opae Ula are on such a different level!

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        • JimS says:

          They are, and part of their fascination is the mystery that surrounds them. We actually know very little about them. They live in anchialine pools in Hawaii that are in danger of being destroyed by overdevelopment. Thus, hobbyists may be their ticket to survival. A problem, though, is that hobbyists are getting their opae from a wide range of sources, and this is impacting the unique characteristics of opae from different areas in the state. For the fascinating story of how opae’ula became a hobby, read about Dr. Wayne Nishijima. -Jim

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        • Ann says:

          That is a fascinating article. I love reading about animal habitats and husbandry. It’s almost too unbelievable! Hopefully, there will be enough hobby breeders to stop collection from their natural habitat.
          Ann

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